THERE'S HOPE
THERE'S HELP

Please review our service

ONTARIO TOLL-FREE: 1‑844‑647‑6869
TEXT TICKET: 226-240-2480
INFO@OTDLEGAL.CA

FREE CONSULTATION

Complimentary, No Obligation

Any information provided is confidential and is used solely to assist you.

Upload Ticket Here:

Unpaid Tickets In Ontario To Denied Licence Plates

In 2015 the Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act was passed.  One of the final pieces of that legislation will go into effect May 2017 to provide Municipalities the ability to deny licence plates to individuals who have outstanding court fines owing.  With approximately $1.4 billion in outstanding fines owed to municipalities it is hoped that this new legislation will encourage individuals to address their overdue court fines.

There are a few limitations.  The first being that this will only be retroactive for seven years, which covers roughly 1/3 or $500 million in overdue fines.  This legislation will also not apply to vehicles that are jointly owned or that are owned by a company.

Currently, a court fine that is not paid within the period set by the court will result in the defendant’s licence being suspended.  Drive Under Suspension carries very significant penalties such as a fine ranging between $1,000 to $5,000 (plus the 25% victim fine surcharged) for a first offence, a mandatory further 6 month suspension, and possible imprisonment.  The current process of a suspended driver’s licence provides significant motivation to get fines paid along with a hefty penalty for continuing to drive while the licence is suspended.

Driving a vehicle without a plate or an up-to-date validation sticker will generally result in a ticket for $85.00 plus court costs and victim fine surcharge for a total of $110.00.  By comparison, this new tool to encourage individuals to pay their outstanding fines carries much less consequence.  Although not having a plate or up-to-date validation sticker would certainly be more visible to police as a red flag in comparison to checking a licence plate number to discover that the driver has a suspended licence.

Of other concern, the fact that the new legislation does not apply to vehicles jointly owned or that are owned by a company provide avenues for individuals to still have their vehicles properly plated.  It will certainly be interesting to see whether this new measure will be enough to encourage some greater portion of the roughly $500 million in outstanding fines that will be effected to be paid.

Allison Jones of The Canadian Press has recently printed an article on this issue in The Toronto Star.

Ontario drivers with unpaid speeding tickets to be denied licence plates

WITH MUNICIPALITIES IN THE PROVINCE OWED A COLLECTIVE $1.4 BILLION IN UNPAID TICKETS, THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENT HOPES THE NEW PENALTY WILL ENCOURAGE SPEEDING SCOFFLAWS TO PAY OUTSTANDING FINES.

Posted under Traffic Ticket Defence

Previous Post:

Next Post: