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How to Appeal a Traffic Ticket in Ontario

If you’ve recently received a traffic ticket in Ontario, you don’t have to worry about a traffic ticket going on your record if you’re able to fight the charge, and beat it. The process is lengthy, including months of court appearances in a lower court before the entry of an appeal. An appeal only happens after a conviction.

Here, we’re going to discuss how to appeal a traffic ticket in Ontario.

What Is an Appeal?

If you’re convicted of a speeding ticket, you may be interested in appealing that conviction through the courts. A professional, such as OTD Ticket Defenders and Legal Services, exist to help you through this process.

If you think that there’s been an error in law or judgment, you may have grounds to overturn any guilty conviction that you receive. 

Traffic ticket appeals can help to keep your driving record clean. There is no fee to appeal a traffic ticket in Ontario. Multiple violations can lead to the revocation of your license or denial of plates for your vehicle. 

If you win your appeal, the courts will strike the traffic violation in question from your record. They will also order a new trial in some cases. The end of your appeal doesn’t mean it’s over. 

How to Appeal a Traffic Ticket in Ontario

  • Pay your fine.
  • Prepare appeal – this may be time consuming, and your licence may be revoked during this time. Appeal should include:
    • Your transcripts of the original court hearing,
    • A list or explain the grounds for the appeal,
    • Your affidavits where necessary,
    • Proof of the fine payment.
  • File appeal.
    • Any appeals must be filed within thirty (30) days of the conviction. If the thirty (30) days have passed, the defendant must apply for a “Motion to Extend the Time to File an Appeal”
    • The fine must be paid before an appeal will be accepted, or you must file a motion to appeal without paying the fine.
    • Court transcripts will be required where a trial has been held.
  • Get your appeal date. 
  • Explain to the appeals court where the original Justice made an error in law or judgement.
    • Any transcripts from the original court hearing must be provided.

Appealing a ticket conviction can be a confusing process. Without a background in the law and an understanding of the court systems, it’s all too common for individuals to either provide weak arguments or accidentally convict themselves. 

What Are the Grounds for an Appeal?

After getting a speeding ticket, drivers want to know how to fight the ticket and avoid conviction. Or, in the case of a conviction, seeking an appeal is the next step, but if possible it’s best to win your case instead.

If you think that the Justice has made either an error in law or an error in judgment, you can file an appeal. Doing so gives you the chance to overturn your conviction and go back to a clean driving record. This might lead to a new trial ordered.

Errors in Law

If there is an error in law, it may invalidate any Ontario traffic tickets that you receive. Courts have to follow strict procedures for a conviction to be legal and valid. 

The court has to offer the defendant a reopening request, as refusal could be grounds for an appeal. The judge must also allow you to make submissions before your sentencing. 

During proceedings, the judge has to ignore hearsay evidence and uphold valid defenses to a charge. If you make any statements, they must be given voluntarily and not under pressure. Otherwise, you may be able to appeal your charges. 

The judge must also give valid reasoning for their decision to convict. If her verdict is unreasonable or has no legal grounds, you may be able to overturn your conviction and keep your driving record clean. 

Sometimes, you may see bias in judgment on the part of the court. If you can provide sufficient evidence that there was a bias against you, then you can file an appeal and request a more impartial hearing. 

Errors in Fact

If a party presents false evidence during your court proceedings, it may also be grounds for an appeal. The courts are required to take into account all the necessary evidence that you can bring to your case. 

If the court considers false evidence or ignores information that could exonerate you, you will have a good chance of appealing their decision. Eyewitness accounts, camera footage, and testimony from officers could all potentially help to strengthen your case.

Rules for Traffic Ticket Appeals

If you plan on pursuing an appeal for a traffic ticket, you need to make sure that you follow the rules to give yourself the best chance of winning your case.

You have to file your appeal within 30 days of your conviction date, or you’ll lose eligibility to overturn your guilty plea. However, you may be able to give yourself more time by applying for a Motion to Extend the Time to File an Appeal.

There is no fee to appeal, and you don’t need transcripts to begin the process. When the time comes, you should be able to explain your grounds for filing an appeal, any necessary affidavits, and file a motion to appeal without paying the fine, such as a motion to extend time to appeal. Aside from there being no fee, transcripts are not necessary and there is no mandatory deposit amount.

Seek Help to Fight Your Ticket or Appeal Your Conviction

Whether you’re fighting a ticket or appealing a conviction, it takes time. While you fight your ticket your insurance rate won’t go up because your insurance company will only find out about a conviction if it ends up on your record. 

It’s a good idea to examine all your options after receiving a traffic ticket. A legal agent can use their expertise to help you get the best possible results under your charge, and they will review your circumstances. If you do get a ticket, contacting a legal professional such as OTD Ticket Defenders and getting a free consultation will open up your options to have an agent fight your ticket.

Traffic Ticket Appeal Delays

Sometimes, appeals can get held up when it takes longer than expected to collect all the necessary paperwork. Transcripts can take months or even years to complete. 

The average time varies by jurisdiction. For example, in Toronto, it often takes around 24 to 30 months to receive a copy of your court transcript. If obtaining your transcript leads to significant delays, you may be able to get a refund on your deposit fee. 

We hope that our guide has given you a little bit more insight into how to appeal a traffic ticket in Ontario. You can fight your ticket. An appeal is not an easy or straightforward process. An expert agent at OTD Ticket Defenders can help you fight all kinds of traffic tickets. The benefits of expert legal advice are numerous. A professional agent can walk you through every aspect of the process and show you how to avoid your fines or deal with your conviction. 

When can you file an appeal? 

You can file an appeal after a trial or after a conviction has been registered if there are factors that would allow for an appeal 

You cannot just appeal a conviction because you didn’t’ like the Justice’ decision on your case. There must have been an error in law or an error within the Justice’ reasoning that lead to a conviction being registered. 

What if you paid your ticket and found out later that there were severe consequences that you are now facing as a result of the conviction?

In this circumstance you could appeal based on the fact that by paying the ticket your plea was not fully informed. For a plea to be fully informed, you must be aware of the consequences associated with a plea. For example: Bob gets a ticket for BAC Above Zero – Young Driver. Bob sees that the ticket is a mere $85 fine plus costs and pays the ticket. Within 2 weeks of paying the conviction, Bob receives a notice from the Ministry of Transportation stating that his licence will go under suspension on January 1 2020 for a period of 30 days due to the conviction. Would Bob have grounds to file an appeal? Yes he would. Bob would have grounds because when Bob paid his ticket, he was unaware of the consequence and in this particular case, one of the consequences was a licence suspension. Now if Bob had known that there was a licence suspension that was attached to this ticket and paid the ticket anyway, then Bob would not have grounds to appeal. 

What does the law say about appeals? 

Appeals under Part I and II

Appeals, proceedings commenced by certificate

135 (1) A defendant or the prosecutor or the Attorney General by way of intervention is entitled to appeal an acquittal, conviction or sentence in a proceeding commenced by certificate under Part I or II and the appeal shall be to the Ontario Court of Justice presided over by a provincial judge.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 135 (1); 2000, c. 26, Sched. A, s. 13 (6).

Application for appeal

(2) A notice of appeal shall be in the prescribed form and shall state the reasons why the appeal is taken and shall be filed with the clerk of the court within 30 days after the making of the decision appealed from, in accordance with the rules of court.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 135 (2); 2009, c. 33, Sched. 4, s. 1 (57).

Simultaneous application

(2.1) Despite subsection (2), the notice of appeal may be filed at the same time as an application under section 85 to extend the time to give notice of appeal.  2009, c. 33, Sched. 4, s. 1 (58).

Notice of hearing

(3) The clerk shall, as soon as is practicable, give a notice to the defendant and prosecutor of the time and place of the hearing of the appeal.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 135 (3); 2017, c. 34, Sched. 35, s. 25.

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Conduct of appeal

136 (1) Upon an appeal, the court shall give the parties an opportunity to be heard for the purpose of determining the issues and may, where the circumstances warrant it, make such inquiries as are necessary to ensure that the issues are fully and effectively defined.

Review

(2) An appeal shall be conducted by means of a review.

Evidence

(3) In determining a review, the court may,

(a) hear or rehear the recorded evidence or any part thereof and may require any party to provide a transcript of the evidence, or any part thereof, or to produce any further exhibit;

(b) receive the evidence of any witness whether or not the witness gave evidence at the trial;

(c) require the justice presiding at the trial to report in writing on any matter specified in the request; or

(d) receive and act upon statements of agreed facts or admissions.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 136.

Dismissal on abandonment

137 (1) Where an appeal has not been proceeded with or abandoned, the court may order that the appeal be dismissed.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 137.

Dismissal by justice

(2) Where the clerk of the court considers that an appeal has not been proceeded with or has been abandoned, the clerk may, after giving notice to the parties to the appeal, have the matter brought before a justice sitting in open court to determine whether the appeal has been abandoned and the appeal should be dismissed.  2009, c. 33, Sched. 4, s. 1 (59).

Motion to restore

(3) A party to an appeal that was dismissed under subsection (2) may apply to have the appeal restored.  2009, c. 33, Sched. 4, s. 1 (59).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Powers of court on appeal

138 (1) Upon an appeal, the court may affirm, reverse or vary the decision appealed from or where, in the opinion of the court, it is necessary to do so to satisfy the ends of justice, direct a new trial.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 138 (1).

New trial

(2) Where the court directs a new trial, it shall be held in the Ontario Court of Justice presided over by a justice other than the justice who tried the defendant in the first instance, but the appeal court may, with the consent of the parties to the appeal, direct that the new trial be held before the justice who tried the defendant in the first instance or before the judge who directs the new trial.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 138 (2); 2000, c. 26, Sched. A, s. 13 (6).

Costs

(3) Upon an appeal, the court may make an order under section 60 for the payment of costs incurred on the appeal, and subsection (3) thereof applies to the order.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 138 (3).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Appeal to Court of Appeal

139 (1) An appeal lies from the judgment of the Ontario Court of Justice in an appeal under section 135 to the Court of Appeal, with leave of a judge of the Court of Appeal, on special grounds, upon any question of law alone.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 139 (1); 2000, c. 26, Sched. A, s. 13 (6).

Grounds for leave

(2) No leave to appeal shall be granted under subsection (1) unless the judge of the Court of Appeal considers that in the particular circumstances of the case it is essential in the public interest or for the due administration of justice that leave be granted.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 139 (2).

Costs

(3) Upon an appeal under this section, the Court of Appeal may make any order with respect to costs that it considers just and reasonable.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 139 (3).

Appeal as to leave

(4) No appeal or review lies from a decision on a motion for leave to appeal under subsection (1).  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 139 (4).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Appeals under Part III

Appeals, proceedings commenced by information

116 (1) Where a proceeding is commenced by information under Part III, the defendant or the prosecutor or the Attorney General by way of intervention may appeal from,

(a) a conviction;

(b) a dismissal;

(c) a finding as to ability, because of mental disorder, to conduct a defence;

(d) a sentence; or

(e) any other order as to costs.  2009, c. 33, Sched. 4, s. 1 (54).

Appeal court

(2) An appeal under subsection (1) shall be,

(a) where the appeal is from the decision of a justice of the peace, to the Ontario Court of Justice presided over by a provincial judge; or

(b) where the appeal is from the decision of a provincial judge, to the Superior Court of Justice.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 116 (2); 2000, c. 26, Sched. A, s. 13 (5, 6).

Notice of appeal

(3) The appellant shall give notice of appeal in such manner and within such period as is provided by the rules of court.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 116 (3).

Simultaneous application

(4) Despite subsection (3), the notice of appeal may be filed at the same time as an application under section 85 to extend the time to give notice of appeal.  2009, c. 33, Sched. 4, s. 1 (55).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Conduct of appeal

117 (1) The court may, where it considers it to be in the interests of justice,

(a) order the production of any writing, exhibit or other thing relevant to the appeal;

(a.1) amend the information, unless it is of the opinion that the defendant has been misled or prejudiced in his or her defence or appeal;

(b) order any witness who would have been a compellable witness at the trial, whether or not he or she was called at the trial,

(i) to attend and be examined before the court, or

(ii) to be examined in the manner provided by the rules of court before a judge of the court, or before any officer of the court or justice of the peace or other person appointed by the court for the purpose;

(c) admit, as evidence, an examination that is taken under subclause (b) (ii);

(d) receive the evidence, if tendered, of any witness;

(e) order that any question arising on the appeal that,

(i) involves prolonged examination of writings or accounts, or scientific investigation, and

(ii) cannot in the opinion of the court conveniently be inquired into before the court,

be referred for inquiry and report, in the manner provided by the rules of court, to a special commissioner appointed by the court; and

(f) act upon the report of a commissioner who is appointed under clause (e) in so far as the court thinks fit to do so.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 117 (1); 2009, c. 33, Sched. 4, s. 1 (56).

Rights of parties

(2) Where the court exercises a power under this section, the parties or their representatives are entitled to examine or cross-examine witnesses and, in an inquiry under clause (1) (e), are entitled to be present during the inquiry and to adduce evidence and to be heard.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 117 (2); 2006, c. 21, Sched. C, s. 131 (18).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Right to representation

118 (1) An appellant or respondent may appear and act personally or by representative.  2006, c. 21, Sched. C, s. 131 (19).

Attendance while in custody

(2) An appellant or respondent who is in custody as a result of the decision appealed from is entitled to be present at the hearing of the appeal.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 118 (2).

Sentencing in absence

(3) The power of a court to impose sentence may be exercised although the appellant or respondent is not present.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 118 (3).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Written argument

119 An appellant or respondent may present the case on appeal and argument in writing instead of orally, and the court shall consider any case or argument so presented.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 119.

Orders on appeal against conviction, etc.

120 (1) On the hearing of an appeal against a conviction or against a finding as to the ability, because of mental disorder, to conduct a defence, the court by order,

(a) may allow the appeal where it is of the opinion that,

(i) the finding should be set aside on the ground that it is unreasonable or cannot be supported by the evidence,

(ii) the judgment of the trial court should be set aside on the ground of a wrong decision on a question of law, or

(iii) on any ground, there was a miscarriage of justice; or

(b) may dismiss the appeal where,

(i) the court is of the opinion that the appellant, although the appellant was not properly convicted on a count or part of an information, was properly convicted on another count or part of the information,

(ii) the appeal is not decided in favour of the appellant on any ground mentioned in clause (a), or

(iii) although the court is of the opinion that on any ground mentioned in subclause (a) (ii) the appeal might be decided in favour of the appellant, it is of the opinion that no substantial wrong or miscarriage of justice has occurred.

Idem

(2) Where the court allows an appeal under clause (1) (a), it shall,

(a) where the appeal is from a conviction,

(i) direct a finding of acquittal to be entered, or

(ii) order a new trial; or

(b) where the appeal is from a finding as to the ability, because of mental disorder, to conduct a defence, order a new trial, subject to section 44.

Idem

(3) Where the court dismisses an appeal under clause (1) (b), it may substitute the decision that in its opinion should have been made and affirm the sentence passed by the trial court or impose a sentence that is warranted in law.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 120.

Orders on appeal against acquittal

121 Where an appeal is from an acquittal, the court may by order,

(a) dismiss the appeal; or

(b) allow the appeal, set aside the finding and,

(i) order a new trial, or

(ii) enter a finding of guilt with respect to the offence of which, in its opinion, the person who has been accused of the offence should have been found guilty, and pass a sentence that is warranted in law.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 121; 1993, c. 27, Sched.

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Orders on appeal against sentence

122 (1) Where an appeal is taken against sentence, the court shall consider the fitness of the sentence appealed from and may, upon such evidence, if any, as it thinks fit to require or receive, by order,

(a) dismiss the appeal; or

(b) vary the sentence within the limits prescribed by law for the offence of which the defendant was convicted,

and, in making any order under clause (b), the court may take into account any time spent in custody by the defendant as a result of the offence.

Variance of sentence

(2) A judgment of a court that varies a sentence has the same force and effect as if it were a sentence passed by the trial court.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 122.

One sentence on more than one count

123 Where one sentence is passed upon a finding of guilt on two or more counts, the sentence is good if any of the counts would have justified the sentence.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 123; 1993, c. 27, Sched.

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Appeal based on defect in information or process

124 (1) Judgment shall not be given in favour of an appellant based on any alleged defect in the substance or form of an information, certificate or process or any variance between the information, certificate or process and the evidence adduced at trial unless it is shown that objection was taken at the trial and that, in the case of a variance, an adjournment of the trial was refused although the variance had misled the appellant.

Idem

(2) Where an appeal is based on a defect in a conviction or an order, judgment shall not be given in favour of the appellant, but the court shall make an order curing the defect.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 124.

Additional orders

125 Where a court exercises any of the powers conferred by sections 117 to 124, it may make any order, in addition, that justice requires.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 125.

New trial

126 (1) Where a court orders a new trial, it shall be held in the Ontario Court of Justice presided over by a justice other than the justice who tried the defendant in the first instance unless the appeal court directs that the new trial be held before the justice who tried the defendant in the first instance.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 126 (1); 2000, c. 26, Sched. A, s. 13 (6).

Order for release

(2) Where a court orders a new trial, it may make such order for the release or detention of the appellant pending such trial as may be made by a justice under subsection 150 (2) and the order may be enforced in the same manner as if it had been made by a justice under that subsection.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 126 (2).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Appeal by way of new trial

127 (1) Where, because of the condition of the record of the trial in the trial court or for any other reason, the court, upon the motion of the appellant or respondent, is of the opinion that the interests of justice would be better served by hearing and determining the appeal by holding a new trial in the court, the court may order that the appeal shall be heard by way of a new trial in the court and for this purpose this Act applies with necessary modifications in the same manner as to a proceeding in the trial court.

Evidence

(2) The court may, for the purpose of hearing and determining an appeal under subsection (1), permit the evidence of any witness taken before the trial court to be read if that evidence has been authenticated and if,

(a) the appellant and respondent consent;

(b) the court is satisfied that the attendance of the witness cannot reasonably be obtained; or

(c) by reason of the formal nature of the evidence or otherwise the court is satisfied that the opposite party will not be prejudiced,

and any evidence that is read under the authority of this subsection has the same force and effect as if the witness had given the evidence before the court.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 127.

Dismissal or abandonment

128 (1) The court may, upon proof that notice of an appeal has been given and that,

(a) the appellant has failed to comply with any order made under section 110 or 111 or with the conditions of any recognizance entered into under either of those sections; or

(b) the appeal has not been proceeded with or has been abandoned,

order that the appeal be dismissed.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 128; 1993, c. 27, Sched.

Dismissal by justice

(2) Where the clerk of the court considers that an appeal has not been proceeded with or has been abandoned, the clerk may, after giving notice to the parties to the appeal, have the matter brought before a justice sitting in open court to determine whether the appeal has been abandoned and the appeal should be dismissed.  2011, c. 1, Sched. 1, s. 7 (10).

Motion to restore

(3) A party to an appeal that was dismissed under subsection (2) may apply to have the appeal restored.  2011, c. 1, Sched. 1, s. 7 (10).

Section Amendments with date in force (d/m/y)

Costs

129 (1) Where an appeal is heard and determined or is abandoned or is dismissed for want of prosecution, the court may make any order with respect to costs that it considers just and reasonable.

Payment

(2) Where the court orders the appellant or respondent to pay costs, the order shall direct that the costs be paid to the clerk of the trial court, to be paid by the clerk to the person entitled to them, and shall fix the period within which the costs shall be paid.

Enforcement

(3) Costs ordered to be paid under this section by a person other than a prosecutor acting on behalf of the Crown shall be deemed to be a fine for the purpose of enforcing its payment.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 129.

Implementation of appeal court order

130 An order or judgment of the appeal court shall be implemented or enforced by the trial court and the clerk or local registrar of the appeal court shall send to the clerk of the trial court the order and all writings relating thereto.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 130.

Appeal to Court of Appeal

131 (1) A defendant or the prosecutor or the Attorney General by way of intervention may appeal from the judgment of the court to the Court of Appeal, with leave of a judge of the Court of Appeal on special grounds, upon any question of law alone or as to sentence.

Grounds for leave

(2) No leave to appeal shall be granted under subsection (1) unless the judge of the Court of Appeal considers that in the particular circumstances of the case it is essential in the public interest or for the due administration of justice that leave be granted.

Appeal as to leave

(3) No appeal or review lies from a decision on a motion for leave to appeal under subsection (1).  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 131.

Custody pending appeal

132 A defendant who appeals shall, if the defendant is in custody, remain in custody, but a judge may order his or her release upon any of the conditions set out in subsection 150 (2).  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 132.

Transfer of record

133 Where a motion for leave to appeal is made, the Registrar of the Court of Appeal shall notify the clerk or local registrar of the court appealed from of the motion and, upon receipt of the notification, the clerk or local registrar of the court shall transmit to the Registrar all the material forming the record including any other relevant material requested by a judge of the Court of Appeal.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 133.

Application of lower court of appeal procedures, etc.

134 Sections 114, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125 and 126, clause 128 (b) and section 129 apply with necessary modifications to appeals to the Court of Appeal under section 131.  R.S.O. 1990, c. P.33, s. 134.

FAQ about Appeals

What are the steps to Appealing? 

The first step would be to call a legal representative to discuss whether you have grounds to appeal or not. This is a very important step that can save you trouble down the road. After consulting with a legal representative the your next step would be to fill out the appeal paperwork. It is imperative that the appeal paperwork is filled out accurately. If there is an error on the appeal, it could lead to your appeal being dismissed in court. You would also need to pay your fine with the provincial offences court and provide proof of the payment with the appeal (ie attach a receipt).  Once you have filled out the appeal forms then you would need to serve the documents on the prosecutor. After serving the documents on the prosecutor you would then attend the court and have your appeal filed. After filing the appeal with the court you would need to figure out whether your appeal will require transcripts. 

How many copies of transcripts are you required to order when appealing?

When you file an appeal with the court, if transcripts are required (which likely they will be) then 3 copies must be ordered. There will be the original copy for the court, a copy for the prosecution and a copy for the defence. Transcripts can take time to be drafted so it is imperative that you get the transcript request in as soon as you can and ensure that you have proof of requesting the transcripts in case there are any issues before the court prior to the transcripts being completed. 

How do I know if I need transcripts for my appeal? 

Generally, you will always need to order a transcript for an appeal of every date that the case was before the court. Transcripts would not be required for any defendant who had paid a ticket as there would be no recording of the case before the court as the ticket was paid. 

What do I do when I receive the Transcripts from the Transcriptionist? 

The transcriptionist who is handling your transcript request will contact you once the transcripts are prepared. You will be required to pay for the transcripts in full prior to being able to receive the transcripts. 

Once you have the transcripts then you must attend the prosecutor’s office and serve them. You will then need to complete an affidavit of service and attend the court and file a copy of the transcript with the court along with your affidavit of service that will prove you served the prosecutor. 

Who is my Appeal heard in front of? 

Appeals are always heard before a Judge. You can tell that you are in front of a judge by the colour of the sash that the Justice is wearing.  A red sash indicates a Judge, whereas as Green sash indicates a Justice of the Peace. 

How do I know what my grounds for appeal are? 

This is a topic that I strongly urge you to contact our office to discuss if you should need an appeal filed. Once you select your grounds on your appeal, they cannot be changed.

Posted under General

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